Welcome To Bundi

Bundi District is a district of the state of Rajasthan in western India. The town of Bundi is the district headquarters. It has an area of 5,550 km² and a population of 88,273 (2001 census). It is divided into 5 tehsils which are: Bundi, Hin doli, Nainwa, Keshoraipatan and Indragarh.

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Demographics

Economy

geography

History

Tourist Attractions

Demographics

According to the 2011 census Bundi district has a population of 1,113,725, roughly equal to the nation of Cyprus or the US state of Rhode Island. This gives it a ranking of 415th in India (out of a total of 640). The district has a population density of 193 inhabitants per square kilometre (500/sq mi) . Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011 was 15.7%. Bundi has a sex ratio of 922 females for every 1000 males, and a literacy rate of 62.31%.

Economy

The Bundi economy is primarily supported by agriculture, textile and tourism industry. Handicrafts industry plays a pivotal role in the economic prosperity of Bundi in Rajasthan. Bundi is a small city in the Hadoti region of Rajasthan in India, which is famous for its beautiful forts and palaces, and step-well reservoirs (local name: baoris). The economy of Bundi is principally based on rapid growth of small scale industrial units, which have taken on form all over the municipality in the state of Rajasthan. Textiles is an important industrial sector in Bundi that mainly produce polyester fibers. The real estate industry is also growing in this beautiful district of Rajasthan. Agriculture contributes a major portion to the overall economic growth in Bundi. Major agricultural crops include pulses, wheat, gram, barley, cotton, tobacco and oil seeds. Among oil seeds, mustard and rape are the mostly produced. Important fruit trees in Bundi include orange, pomegranate, lemon, guava and mango. Bundi is endowed with great natural beauty and is a popular place of tourists attraction. The tourism accounts for a significant portion of the Rajasthan's domestic product. Many forts and old palaces in Bundi have been converted into heritage hotels to attract more tourists.

geography

Bundi District is bordered to the north by Tonk District, to the west by Bhilwara District, to the East by Kota District and to the southwest by Chittorgarh District.The town of Indragarh and nearby places are famous for the renowned temples of Bijasan Mata and Kamleshwar. The Indargarh step well is considered as one of the most attractive places in the Bundi district, especially during the rainy season.

History

In ancient times, the area around Bundi was apparently inhabited by various local tribes, of which the Parihar Meenas were prominent. Bundi and the eponymous princely state are said to derive their names from a former Meena king called Manan shrestha. Bundi was previously called “Bunda-Ka-Nal", Nal meaning “narrow ways”. Bundi is situated in a narrow valley within the Aravalli Hills in Rajasthan. Later the region was governed by Rao Deva Hada, who took over Bundi from Jaita Meena in 1342, renaming the surrounding area Haravati or Haroti.n 1804 Rao Raja Bishan Singh (1773–1821) gave valuable assistance to Colonel Monson in his disastrous retreat before Holkar, in revenge for which the Maratha Empire and Pindaris continually ravaged his state and forced the kingdom to pay tribute up to 1817. Consequently, Bishan Singh made a subsidiary alliance with the British East India Company on 10 February 1818, which brought him under its protection. was responsible for the creation of the pleasure palace of Sukh Niwas on the outskirts of Bundi.When dying of cholera, Bishan Singh entrusted James Tod with guardianship of his 11-year-old son, Ram Singh. Maharao Raja Ram Singh (1821–89) grew up to be a much respected ruler who initiated economic and administrative reforms and established schools for the teaching of Sanskrit. On the throne for 68 years, he was described as a grand specimen of the Rajput gentleman and "the most conservative prince in conservative Rajputana." His rule was popular and beneficial; and though during the mutiny of 1857 his attitude was equivocal, he continued to enjoy the confidence of the British, being created G.C.S.I. and a counselor of the empire in 1877 and C.I.E. in 1878. He was succeeded by his adopted son Raghubir Singh (1889–1927), who was made a K.C.S.I. in 1897 and a G.C.I.E. in 1901. His reign was blighted by two disastrous famines. Despite his best efforts at alleviation, the population of his kingdom was reduced from some 258,000 to 171,000 by 1901 due to death and emigration. Raghubir Singh supported the British during the World War. At the time of the partition of India in 1947, the British abandoned their suzerainty over the princely states, which were left to decide whether to remain independent or to accede to the newly independent Dominion of India or to Pakistan. The ruler of the state of Bundi decided to accede to India, which later became the Union of India. This brought the internal affairs of Bundi under the control of Delhi. 

Tourist Attractions

The Taragarh Fort, or 'Star Fort' is the most impressive of the city's structures. It was constructed in AD 1354 upon the top of steep hillside overlooking the city. The largest of its battlements is the 16th century bastion known as the Bhim Burj, on which was once mounted a particularly large cannon called Garbh Gunjam, or 'Thunder from the Womb'. The fort is a popular tourist viewpoint of the city below. The fort contains three tanks which never dry up. The technique with which they were built has been long since lost but the tanks survive as a testament to the advanced methods of construction and engineering in medieval India. The Bundi Palace is situated on the hillside adjacent to the Taragarh Fort and is notable for its lavish traditional murals and frescoes. The Chitrashala (picture gallery) of the palace is open to the general public. The largest of Bundi's baoris or stepwells is the intricately carved Raniji ki Baori. Some 46 m deep, it was built in 1699 by Rani Nathavatji. The steps built into the sides of the water-well made water accessible even when at a very low level. The baori is one of the largest examples of its kind in Rajasthan. The Nawal Sagar is a large square-shaped artificial lake in the centre of Bundi containing many small islets. A temple dedicated to Varuna, the vedic god of water, stands half-submerged in the middle of the lake. the lake feeds the numerous bavdis in the old city by creating an artificial water table. The Nagar Sagar twin step wells are identical step wells crafted in pristine masonry on either side of the main spine of Bundi town. The kunds (pools) are currently full of waste from the ancient vegetable market in the vicinity. The Dabhai Kund also known as the jail kund, is the largest of the kunds in Bundi. Though slightly overgrown, it is well worth a visit for the spectacular carvings on the numerous steps leading down to the water level.
Sukh Mahal
Jait Sagar Lake
Phool Sagar
Kshar Bagh
Chaurasi Khambon ki Chhatri, Bundi or Eighty four pillared cenotaph
The Stepwells
There are over 50 stepwells in Bundi, of which only a handful have been maintained. They used to be the only source of water for the town until a piped water system was introduced. After that these stepwells were abandoned and the monuments fell into disrepair. Most of the former stepwells inside the town have become refuse dumps, and are slipping out of the public consciousness.