Welcome To Kaimur

Kaimur district is one of the thirty-eight districts of Bihar state, India. The district headquarters are located at Bhabua. The district occupies an area of 3363 km² and has a population of 1,626,384 (as of 2011) with the rank of 307th in the country. The district has a Literacy rate of 69.34% (392nd in the country). Kaimur district is a part of Patna division.It is the westernmost district of Bihar, western point of Bihar called Chand is situated on the Bhabua-Chandauli road. The district has 18 Colleges, 58 High Schools, 146 Middle Schools and 763 Primary Schools. The district has a total no. of 1699 villages. The district also has 120 Post Offices and 151 Panchayats.

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Divisions

Geography

HISTORY

Tourist Attractions

Transportaion

Divisions

Sub Divisions: Mohania subdivision, Bhabua subdivision

Blocks: Bhabua, Ramgarh, Mohania, Durgawati, Adhaura, Bhagwanpur, Chand, Chainpur, Kudra, Rampur, Nuawon

Geography

Kaimur district occupies an area of 3,362 square kilometres (1,298 sq mi), comparatively equivalent to Russia's Vaygach Island.The Kaimur Range and Rohtas Plateau cover the southern part of this district. The Karmnasha and Durgawati rivers run through the district. A large forest covers part of Kaimur; it measures 1,06,300 hectares and contains the Kaimur Wildlife Sanctuary which is home to tigers, leopards and chinkaras. Rivers: Durgavati River, Karmanasa River, Kudra river. Waterfall: Karkat Waterfall, Telhar.  The climate of the district is somewhat extreme in nature, i.e., quite hot during the summer and fairly cold during the winter.January is the coldest month when the mean minimum temperature comes down to approximately 4 degree C.. The temperature starts rising from March and reaches its peak in May when the mercury touches about 450C. Rain starts sometime in mid June and lasts till mid September. The district gets easterly winds from June to September, and from October to May wind direction reverses. Maximum rains occur during the months of July and August (289 mm). Sometimes winter rains occur in Jan-February. Originating from the Kaimur hills, the river Karmanasha passes through Mirzapur district of U.P. and forms the western boundary of the district for about 170 Kms. The river Kudra, which forms eastern boundary separating Rohtas district, is a branch of the river Dhoba rising in Kaimur Plateau South-West of Tilauthu, and ultimately joins the river Karmanasha. The River Durgawati originates from Kaimur hills and flows in the northern direction. It is joined by the Kudra River before it merges finally into the river Karmanasha. The river Durgawati is perennial in nature and inundates a large area of land during heavy rains.

HISTORY

Kaimur has an old and interesting history. In pre-historic days the plateau region of the district has been the abode of the aboriginals whose chief representatives now are the Bhars, the Cheros and the Savers. According to some legends, the Kharwars were the original settlers in the hilly tracts of Rohtas. The Ovaons also claim that they ruled over the stretch falling between Rohtas and Patna. One local legend also connects Sasaram the present headquarters of Rohtas with king Sahasrarjun, who was killed by Saint Parshuram in a fight. The district of Kaimur formed part of the mighty Magadh Empire from 6th century B.C. to 5th century A.D., under the Mauryan and Gupta rulers of Magadh. In the 7th century A.D., this district came under the control of Harshawardhan, the ruler of Kannouj. An inscription in the Mundeshwari temple near Bhabua refers to the king Udaysena asthe ruling chief of the area. The Seal of king Sasanka of Guada in Bengal is inscribed at Rohtasgarh in the district of Rohtas. The famous Chinese pilgrim Huen- tang, who journeyed through the country in the 7th century A.D., passed through Arrah, the headquarters of the old Shahabad district through this region of newly formed Kaimur district. The area of the district successively came under the rulers of Shail dynasty of central India and Pal dynasty ofBengal. According to C. Mark, a historian, the first ruler of Pal dynasty controlled this region. Later on Chandauli controlled Varanasi-Chandawali and also the Kaimur district in the 12th century, as confirmed by the Tarachandi inscription near Sasaram. After the fall of the Guptas the district in all probability relapsed into the hands of the aboriginal tribes and came under the control of petty chieftains. The Rajputs who came from Ujjain, and the province of Mallwa had a series of conflicts with the aboriginals and it took them many hundred years to subdue the aboriginal completely. The Census report of 1961 describes that when Bakhtiar Khiliji attacked Bihar in 1193 A.D., he found Shahabad in the hands of petty Rajput chiefs often fighting among themselves. They were not united and strong enough to offer powerful resistance to the Muslim invaders. Hence Bakhtiyar Khiliji had an easy victory over them and the district soon became a part of his kingdom. Later it was annexed, along with the rest of Bihar, to the kingdom of Jaunpur. A hundred year later, it passed under the direct control of the Muslim empire of Delhi. Sher Shah's father, Hassan Khan Sur, got the Jagir of Sasaram. Later Baler invaded the area in 1529 and has mentioned Hindu superstitions about river Karmanasha. In 1537 the old Shahabad district witnessed advancement of Humayun and his subsequent conflict with Sher Shah at Chausa. Later the district of Shahabad (which includes present Kaimur district also) was included in Akbar's empire. In 1758, Shah Alam during his conflict with Lord Clive of East India Company, went to Durgawati and with the help of local Zamindar Pahalwan Singh crossed the Karmanasha River. Subsequently Pahalwan Singh succumbed to comply and live on the latter's terms. In 1764, the old Shahabad district witnessed conflict for supremacy and the English became absolute masters of the area after defeating Siraj-ud-daula in the battle of Buxar. Again the area was shaken by the rebellion of Raja Chait Singh of Banaras but eventually the English succeeded in suppressing the revolt. Lastly the historic 1857 mutiny under command of Kunwar Singh had its impact in the district. As a result, during the independence movement the district had a substantial contribution to the freedom of India. Much after independence in the year 1972 Rohtas district was formed out of the old Shahabad district and in the year 1991. The present Kaimur district was formed out of the Rohtas district.

Tourist Attractions

The major attractions of the Kaimur tourism are Kaimur Wildlife Sanctuary, Baidyanath, Maa Mundeshwari Temple, Chorghatia, Karmanasa River, Sidhanath temple and many more promising sites. Kaimur tourism offers a taste of everything and doesn’t disappoint its tourists. Temples, forts, hills, forest, waterfalls, and scenic spots around Kaimur, blessing Kaimur tourism as the perfect multi-faceted destination. Telhar is a beautiful waterfall located near B.T. Road in Kaimur. Set in a natural setting the waterfalls is a great feast for the eyes. Kaimur is a host to a large number of Hindu festivals and melas, each celebrated at different pilgrim hubs and temples. Hordes of tourists as well as pilgrims visit Kaimur to observe it’s tranquil from close quarters.

Mundeshwari: This temple is a protected monument under ASI since 1915 and according to ASI the time of construction dates back to 635 AD. It is considered the oldest functional temple of India. Most of the structure have been destroyed and currently gathered around the temple in huge heaps. The Four- Faced Shivlinga at the centre of the sanctum sanctorum but the presiding goddess deity Mundeshwari is placed at one of the niche of this octagonal temple. A road is built almost till the base of the temple at the top of the hill to facilitate the devotees reaching by vehicle. The Mundeshwari hill emerges on the horizon beyond the wide field as the temple is approached. As it is a place of Sakti, the devotees were used to offer animal sacrifice earlier. However, the animal sacrifice is no more legal but the devotees still bring the animals for offerings and take them back, after taking the blessings of the mother goddess.

 

 

Transportaion

NH 2 (G.T. Road) crosses through the center of the district from Karmanasha to Kudra for about 50 km. NH 30 originates from it near Mohania and connects this district with the capital Patna via Arah. Apart from these, there are also a few State Highways in the district. Mohania Block is situated on Gaya-Mughalsarai Section of Grand Chord Railway line; the railway station is called Bhabua Road. The district headquarter is located at a distance of 14 Kms southward from the railway station or the G.T. Road.