Welcome To Rajasthan

Rajasthan, the largest state of India was formed on 30 March 1949 with Jaipur as the state capital. Once known as the 'Land of the Kings', the state still retains the glory and richness of those times with its marvelous monuments, colourful traditions and customs. It covers most of the area of the Great Indian desert (Thar Desert) with one edge paralleling the Sutlej - Indus river valley along with its border with Pakistan. It borders Pakistan to the west, the Indian state of Gujarat to the southwest, Madhya Pradesh to the southeast, Uttar Pradesh and Haryana to the northeast and Punjab to the north.Rajasthani and Hindi are the widely used languages in the state.

Categories

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culture

Demographics

Education

geography

History

Tourist Attractions

culture

Rajasthan has artistic and cultural traditions which reflect the ancient Indian way of life. There is a rich and varied folk culture from villages which is often depicted symbolic of the state. Rajasthan had a glorious history. It is known for many brave kings, their deeds; and their interest in art and architecture. Its name means “the land of the rajas”. It was also called Rajputana (the country of the Rajputs); whose codes of chivalry shaped social mores just as their often bitter and protected feuding dominated their politics. Rajasthan, the land of Kings. Drenched into royal grandeur and soaked into glorious history, Rajasthan is one of the most charming and captivating states of India. It has been globally famous tourism destination with lots of tourist attractions and fabulous tourist facilities. This historical state of India attracts tourists and vacationers with its rich culture, tradition, heritage, and monuments. It is also rich in its flora and fauna with some of popular wildlife sanctuaries & national parks.

Demographics

Rajasthan has a mainly Rajasthani population of approximately 68,621,012. Rajasthan's population is made up mainly of Hindus, who account for 88.8% of the population. Muslims make up 8.5%, Sikhs 1.4% and Jains 1.2% of the population. The state of Rajasthan is also populated by Sindhis, who came to Rajasthan from Sindh province (now in Pakistan) during the India-Pakistan separation in 1947.Hindi is the official and the most widely spoken language in the state (91% of the population as per the 2001 census), followed by Bhili (5%), Punjabi (2%), and Urdu (1%).

Education

During recent years, Rajasthan has worked on the state of education. The state government has been making sustained efforts to improve the education standard.In recent decades, the literacy rate of Rajasthan has increased significantly. In 1991, the state's literacy rate was only 38.55% (54.99% male and 20.44% female). In 2001, the literacy rate increased to 60.41% (75.70% male and 43.85% female). This was the highest leap in the percentage of literacy recorded in India (the rise in female literacy being 23%). At the Census 2011, Rajasthan had a literacy rate of 67.06% (80.51% male and 52.66% female). Although Rajasthan's literacy rate is below the national average of 74.04% and although its female literacy rate is the lowest in the country (followed by Bihar at 53.33%), the state has been praised for its efforts and achievements in raising male and female literacy rates. Rajasthan is home to the educational institutions Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, IIT Jodhpur, IIM Udaipur and LNMIIT. Kota, Rajasthan, is known for its excellent coaching for the engineering and medical college entrance examinations. Rajasthan has nine universities and more than 250 colleges, 55,000 primary and 7,400 secondary schools. There are 41 engineering colleges with an annual enrolment of about 11,500 students. The state has 23 polytechnic colleges and 152 Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs) that impart vocational training. In 2009, Central University of Rajasthan a central university fully funded by Government of India, came into force near Kishangarh in Ajmer district.

In rural areas of Rajasthan, the literacy rate is 76.16% for males and 45.8% for females. This has been debated across all the party level except BJP, when the governor of Rajasthan set a minimum educational qualification for the village panchayat elections.[39][40]

geography

Rajasthan is the largest state in the Indian Union. Geographically, the land of Rajasthan is more varied than any other region. It is a region of lofty rocks, rolling sand dunes, of burning heat and freezing cold, of fertile plains and deep wild glens and jungles. The Aravalli range, which is the oldest folded range in the world, divides the area into two natural divisions-North-West and South-East. North-West area is a sandy and ill watered tract emerging gradually from a mere desert in the west and North-West to comparatively fertile land towards the East and North-East in the neighborhood of the Aravallis and the track bordering Haryana. The South-Eastern division which is more elevated and fertile than the North-West, has a very diversified character with extensive hill ranges, pockets of woodland, several large rivers, fertile tablelands and stretches of excellent soil. The Arid high plateau of South-Western Rajasthan is broken by wild cliffs and hill ranges. Irrigation dams or deep wells are the source of water for the fields in the oases lying within the Valleys. Unending sand dunes of BarmerCliffs form the backdrop of Jodhpur, disappear into the endless barren plain from which the medieval fort of Nagaur rises as a landmark. Beyond this is the Thar desert which is a part of the great Indian desert-Burning like a furnace even in early March, it is the 'Maru-kantar', the region of death. Aravalli range starts from the borders of Delhi and becomes well defined before Alwar. The forests of Alwar, Bharatpur and Sawai- Madhopur are the home of the tiger, the panther, the wild boar, the blue bull and the more graceful and agile animals of the deer family. The plains here are level and flat, with rich alluvial loam. Down south, in Kota and Bundi, in the Chittorgarh and Bhilwara districts, wheat, maize, paddy and sugarcane fields sprawl along the river-banks. The very opposite of its western counterpart, Eastern Rajasthan has much that belies the notion of Rajasthan being a desert state. The plateau on which this picturesque city stands marks the highest elevation of the plains of North India and it is called the watershed of India. Guru Sikhar or the Hermit's peak which is the highest point of the range near Mount Abu may be described as the roof of this region.

History

The home of the valiant Rajputs known for their bravery and chivalry, Rajasthan is said to have been a region where human settlement dated back to the early historical period. Archaeological excavations establish a connection with the Harappan culture which dates to about 1000BC. In the period from 3000-500BC this region formed a part of the river valley inhabitation. The relics of Virat also speaks of the area being inhabited by the Pre-Aryan people of the oldest called Push Karara Nanya (modern Pushkar in Ajmer). The first Aryan settlement here was at Dundhmer in modern Dundhar. The influence of Jainism and Buddhism, also spread to this region. It witnessed the rule of the Magadha, Kushanas and the Guptas, during which it was divided into Mahajanapadas and Janapadas. Rajasthan formed part of the Mauryan Empire in about 130-150AD and the Guptas ruled it in the 4th century. From about 640AD the Gujars, Pratiharas, Chauhans, Gahlots etc established their independent Kingdoms. Internal rivalry between the Rajput Kingdoms led to the establishment of many strong Rajput Kingdoms which resisted the supreme domination of the Mughals. The Mughal rule declined by about 1707AD and gave way to the Marathas. The Marathas were subdued by the British who disintegrated many of its areas. After Independence Rajasthan was organised into a state in 1956.

Tourist Attractions

Rajasthan attracted 14 percent of total foreign visitors during 2009–2010 which is the fourth highest among Indian states. It is fourth also in Domestic tourist visitors. Tourism is a flourishing industry in Rajasthan. The palaces of Jaipur and Ajmer-Pushkar, the lakes of Udaipur, the desert forts of Jodhpur, Taragarh Fort (Star Fort) in Bundi, and Bikaner and Jaisalmer rank among the most preferred destinations in India for many tourists both Indian and foreign. Tourism accounts for eight percent of the state's domestic product. Many old and neglected palaces and forts have been converted into heritage hotels. Tourism has increased employment in the hospitality sector.Rajasthan is famous for its forts, carved temples, and decorated havelis, which were built by Rajput kings in pre-Muslim era Rajasthan.[citation needed] Rajasthan's Jaipur Jantar Mantar, Dilwara Temples, Chittorgarh Fort, Lake Palace, miniature paintings in Bundi, and numerous city palaces and havelis are part of the architectural heritage of India. Jaipur, the Pink City, is noted for the ancient houses made of a type of sand stone dominated by a pink hue. In Bundi, maximum houses are painted blue. At Ajmer, there is white marble Bara-dari on the Anasagar lake. Jain Temples dot Rajasthan from north to south and east to west. Dilwara Temples of Mount Abu, Ranakpur Temple dedicated to Lord Adinath in Pali District, Jain temples in the fort complexes of Chittor, Jaisalmer and Kumbhalgarh, Lodurva Jain temples, Mirpur Jain Temple, Sarun Mata Temple kotputli, Bhandasar and Karni Mata Temple of Bikaner are some of the best examples.